COLLARED

Many pets have been there.  Surgery. Wounds. Neutering.  All requiring them to “do time” wearing the dreaded Elizabethan collar.

Queen Elizabeth I wearing the original collar.

Queen Elizabeth I wearing the original collar.

 

The original Elizabethan collar was called a ruff – short for ruffles. It was constructed on gauze wings which were raised at the back of the head and framed the face and hairstyle. It started as a high-frilled collar, that supposedly gave women a more feminine and seductive image.   Men wore ruffs too, although theirs weren’t as ornate as women’s.

Today’s pets don’t find them seductive or fashion forward. But the Elizabethan collars, also known as space collars, E-collars and cones, are useful in keeping them from licking hot spots and having to get surgical sutures re-stitched. Many dogs adjust to a collar in a few minutes. Others put walls and furniture into jeopardy as they bump into things around the house.

Some dogs, like Baily, don’t seem to mind sporting an Elizabethan collar.

"Drop treats into the cone and watch them swirl into my mouth."

“Drop treats into the cone and watch them swirl into my mouth.”

Others, like Leia, not so much.

"Don't blame that thing with the lamp on me."

“Don’t blame that thing with the lamp on me.”

Penelope recently had to have a little cosmetic work done on her eye lid.  Luckily she left her eye alone and didn’t have to wear her Elizabethan collar. But she grudgingly modeled hers for this post.

"Did Queen Elizabeth lick her stitches?"

“Did Queen Elizabeth lick her stitches?”

While Queen Elizabeth may have thought her collars made a fashion statement, two out of three dogs give them a paws down.

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