GERMAN CLASS

It was the start of a brand new obedience class at The Rover Reform School. Usually there’s a wide mix of sizes and breeds in a class. But this class was different. For no particular reason, it was a German class — seven German shepherds. Velvet 2

German shepherds are fast learners and love to work. But often their owners like to teach them in German. And the fact that the owner isn’t German or has no knowledge of the language doesn’t stop them. Smart as they are, German shepherds, like all dogs, aren’t born understanding any language. They are taught commands by use of a lot of repetition and treats.

So the class progressed.  S-L-O-W-L-Y. Before these dogs could learn Sit, Stay, Come, and Wait, their owners had to learn Sit, Stay, Come, and Wait in German. So we waited. And we waited. And we waited until the owners could find the words in their pocket German dictionaries.

So, to make things easier for anyone who wants to teach their dog in German, here is a list of basic commands:

Sit:                               Setzen  (Sedz-en) 

Setzen (Sit)

Setzen (Sit)

Lie Down:                    Legen (Leg-en)   

Legan (Lie Down)

Legan (Lie Down)

 

Come:                          Komm (Kaum)    

Here:                            Hier (Here)  

Wait:                             Halt (Haa-lt)  

Halt (Wait)

Halt (Wait)

 

Let’s Go:                       Gehen (Gay-en) 

Place:                            Platz (Platz)        

Leave It:                       Lassen (Lah-sen)      

Good:                           Gut (G-oot)                

Yes:                                Ja (Yah)                

Keep practicing. Johann

In a few days you’ll have these words down pat.

And in a few minutes, your German shepherd will too.

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One thought on “GERMAN CLASS

  1. I just discovered your site and will be following it!
    You may want to check out my site as well: http://maijaharrington.com. I’m posting chapters from my book-in-progress, Funny Tails: Adventures & Misadventures in Living with Pugs. It’s a lighthearted look at 10 years with our own 3 pugs plus various foster pugs. Readers tell me it’s pretty funny. (And I’m not trying to sell anything.)

    I look forward to more of your stories!
    Maija (pronounced My-uh)

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